Warning: Division by zero in /var/www/portlandbuttonworks.com/portlandbuttonworks.com/catalog/controller/product/category.php on line 332 Zines in the Portland Button Works Zine Distro
We have two ways for you to purchase gift certificates for use on the Portland Button Works Website!   1) Go to this page on our website if you would like to purchase a gift certificate for a specific amount and a unique code will be emailed directly to the recipient. This code can be used at checkout on our website. or 2) Purchase this listing in one of these denominations and we will mail a physical gift certificate to you or directly to your recipient with a unique code to use on our website.   If you would like to add a personalized note, let us know in the order notes.   Either of these ways to obtain gift certificates are good for anything on our website including custom items or catalog items...
$10.00
Add Toner brings together classic, out of print issues of Cometbus magazine, including 'Lanky' (a novella), 'Back to the Land' (an oral history of the children of hippie homesteaders) plus sixty other interviews and short stories. The text is lovingly handwritten, interspersed with bold graphics and illustrations. Includes never-before-published material. Add Toner is the follow-up to Despite Everything, the best-of collection from the first two decades of Cometbus, called "a classic in the subterranean world" by Time, and "the best loved zine ever" by the San Francisco Bay Guardian...
$12.00
From the peculiar pamphlet series by our friends at Fiddler's Green: The Magical Benefits of Cultivating Bad Habits A Fiddler's Green Leaflet by Clint Marsh & Gerhard 12 pages, 4 illustrations, and copper foil leaf logo on the cover Mystics and intellectuals have extolled the virtues of stimulants throughout all of human history, believing that the use of certain substances can bring them closer to the ineffable. Although arduous journeys along “the poison path” appeal to many psychonauts, there is also much magic to be found in the use of milder stimulants. In this illustrated booklet, Clint Marsh recounts his own history with two such drugs—pipe tobacco and black tea—describing the ways they have brought about creative and philosophical insights that may have otherwise eluded him. Clint Marsh uses elements of myth, magic, folklore, and humor to help people navigate everyday life. He is the editor of Fiddler’s Green Peculiar Parish Magazine and a winner of the Bookseller/Diagram Prize. Gerhard worked for twenty years as background ­artist and cover colorist on the Cerebus graphic novel. Since then, he has done commissioned work through GerhardArt.com, and, most recently, illustrated the Grant ­Morrison story “The Smile of the Absent Cat” for Heavy Metal. Originally published in Fiddler's Green 1  ..
$6.00
This issue of Baked Arcana is a tour journal in iluustrated form form through Cork, Dublin, Belfast, Birmingham, London, Brighton, and Nottingham for Blackcloudsummoner, Luxury Mollusc, and Nacht Undnebel. See and illistrated gallery of album covers played, cats met, macabre items seen at Pitt Rivers Museum, and food that was had...
$3.50
A collection of stories, drawings, photos, interviews, and more about DIY bands, punk, house shows, DIY tours, road trips, and travels. This issue focuses specifically on tours and road trips. Includes contributions from Keith Rosson (Avow zine), Giz (Cheaptoys zine), Sean Williamson, Kelsey K, and many more...
$2.00
This is the 3rd issue of this zine that explores house shows and basement shows. The subtopic of this issue is marginalized Identities in DIY & punk. When you think about it, there's something really special about inviting strangers into your home to enjoy music together, and there's something special about a zine that explores these fleeting experiences that happen all around the world.  DIY punk can be a magical thing, but that doesn't mean that it is perfect. Talking about marginalization is any context is crucial for growth and this zine is such a great documentation of a unique culture. This zine also shares photos and flyers from house shows.  ..
$3.00
The fourth issue of Basements and Living Rooms, a zine about DIY music and house shows, focuses on DIY fests. Includes advice on how to throw a successful fest, how to reduce anxiety during fests, flyers from fests, and house show etiquette.  ..
$3.00
A Zine about DIY Miusic and House shows. This issue is about flyers and photos..
$3.00
The ten-year anniversary issue of Basic Paper Airplane! Short essays about trying to make a living from writing words. Comic nightmares from the world of freelance writing, night school, weekly papers, and cities of books. Paper airplane examples throughout. 32 pages, cut half-letter size. -Antiquated Future..
$3.00
From Antiquated Future: "This issue of the long-running Basic Paper Airplane zine series focuses on interviews—what it means to create that space and all the ways they can succeed or fail. Ten interviews with writers, artists, and musicians that delve into the creative process, identity, family, image, myth, and obsession." Interviews with: musician Owen Ashworth (Advance Base/Casiotone for the Painfully Alone), essayist Elena Passarello (Animals Strike Curious Poses), poet Casey Fuller (A Fort Made of Doors), musician Erika M. Anderson (EMA), filmmaker/installation artist Vanessa Renwick, musician Karl Blau, children's book writer/illustrator Kate Berube (Hannah and Sugar), writer/multimedia artist Dao Strom (We Were Meant to be a Gentle People), writer A.M. O'Malley (Expecting Something Else), and writer/oral historian Audrey Petty (High Rise Stories). 40 pages, half-letter size. Risograph covers by C. Stone and Anthony Michael at Montavilla Press."..
$3.00
from Antiquated Future A zine in tribute to a maligned beauty of pop culture's past: the compact cassette tape. Twenty writers, musicians, DJs, label owners, publishers, and comic artists tell stories of how cassette tapes have affected their lives, for better or worse.  Within: the art of the mixtape, the importance of the boombox, the intimacy of the Walkman. Plus tales of recording with cassettes, performing with cassettes, releasing cassettes, falling in love with cassettes. Nostalgia, subversion, frustration, possibility. Contributions from: Andrew Barton, Ariel Birks, Karleigh Frisbie Brogan, Aaron Burch, Laura Daegling, Tim Devin, Fukumup, Aaron Gilbreath, Cynthia Carmina Gómez, Jack Lewis, Chask'e Lindgren, Pat Maley, Jason Martin, Sara Renberg, Kevin Sampsell, Gina Sarti, Christopher Sutton, Tucker Theodore, and Alexis Wolf. Cover art by Rachel Lee-Carman. Risograph-printed throughout by Whatnow Press. 60 pages, half-letter size. ..
$5.00
July 2020 New issue of Behind the Zines!  There's articles by: Mark Cunning, Ed Kemp, Anna Jo Beck, Corinne Halbert, Todd Taylor, Gianni Simone, Sarah Mirk, Liz Mason, Jenan Freedman, Mike Faloon, Johnnie B Baker, Brian Polk. Plus a bunch of reviews of zines!..
$3.00
A meta zine! I love talking about zines and this zine is like having a conversation with zinesters about zines and zine culture. It's a comp zine with a good variety of perspectives and voices. There's discussions about zines and their relation to punk, notes from zine fests, the reluctance of starting a zine, tracking where your zines go, changes in the process of creating a zine over time, meeting new zinesters, the serious side of perzines, more zine fest reviews,  an interesting analysis of a survey of zine makers, some zine reviews. It's a really sweet look at a really sweet culture of zines...
$3.00
Your favorite zines about zines and zine culture! From Billy: Behind the Zines #9, released in January of 2020! Another issue packed with zine-nerd gold! This zine about zines is for people who are already deeply involved in the culture. Cover by John, of King Cat Comics! So happy to have him be a part of this. He also wrote an article comparing zine fests to comicons. Articles by Todd Taylor (of RazorCake), Jacinta Bunnell (of Girls will Be Boys Will Be Girls...), Ed Kemp of The Word Distribution, Liz Mason from Quimbys, and the list goes on. I'll post a scan of the contents page to see everyone involved, 16 different zinesters contributed. If you write a zine, if you go to zinefests, if you own a long-arm stapler, then this is the zine you want to read. Half-size, 44 pages long. Long live zines!..
$3.00
A Divine zine to learn how to make fermented beverages! kombucha! Tepache! Shrubs! All of those wrapped in high contrast layout by our buddy Milio at the Queer Zine Archive Project!..
$3.00
I haven't made an issue Brainscan in four years and I hope that this zine helps to explain why. Brainscan 21 explores my recognition of being in an emotionally abusive relationship, the attempts on both parts to right wrongs, the failure to do so, and gathering the strength to take the next step. What if your private life in your relationship is vastly different than what other people see? When do you know you are in an emotionally abusive relationship? How to you gain the strength to get out of it? What do you do when you know you can't handle the burden alone? What do you do when you feel so alone and terrified of the consequences of leaving, when if it means losing friends, a home, a job and a way life that you love? These are just some of the ideas explored in this zine through a three year personal narrative that also challenges you to examine your relationships with power, to identify how you express the power you have, and also how you relate to the power that of others possess. But most of all this, zine is about revelation, rebirth, and growth. 44 pages, half sized Reviews: Maximum Rock n Roll "I want to start by saying what I would normally save for the last sentence of a review: I highly recommend this zine. That needs to be stated first because the description of this zine might lead readers to pass it off as one of those way-too-personal post-riot-grrl feminist zines calling some boy out for being a dickhead. I don't know if this is a universal phenomenon, but in Portland, where this zine happens to be from, there was a short-lived but intensely polarized heyday for that sort of zine in the mid-90's. There was even a new term coined, where the allegedly dickheaded boy (or sometimes a girl) is said to have been "zined." In one respect, the subject of this zine, the thinly disguised "J," can be said to have been zined. But the true subject of Brainscan #21 is the writer herself, Alex, who wrote this as a way of working through the pain of ending a six-year-long relationship. Alex paints a plain yet detailed portrait of a relationship where one person uses his ideology and his status in the scene as divices for control and psychological abuse. Alex does not use the word abuse lightly. As a matter of fact the word never even appeared in this zine's original incarnation. It was only after readers pointed out to her that what she experienced was in fact a form of abuse that she came to recognize it as such. I get very uncomfortable reading about suffering of any kind and was afraid that at some point this zine too intense. But Alex manages to describe the intricacies of this dysfunctional relationship without being emotionally overwhelming, and creates a narrative that kept me engaged to the very end. I recommend this to anyone who cares about power dynamics in the scene and in relationships, anyone who may be in an abusive relationship (physical or psychological) or knows someone who is, and most importantly in my eyes, anyone who may be an abuser or the controller in a relationship. That adds up to just about everyone, probably." (PC) Punk Planet Review: Brainscan #21 This issue of Brainscan details zinester Alex Wrekk's experiences in a mentally abusive, oppressive relationship--and her subsequent realization of such abuse and struggle, culminating in a decision to leave. She describes her own thoughts and feelings and the actions of her partner in such a compelling way that it is more about self-discovery than victimization. Her words are powerful and helpful for those experiencing the same kind of torment but who rationalize away the "mind fucks" their partners inflict on them. Through her writing, she calls attention to her past situation to help others and tries to understand why she let herself be controlled in an abusive manner for so long. It is worth reading and largely aims at pointing out such controlling behavior in all people, not just between romantic heterosexual couples. (AJA) Zine World Review: Brainscan #21: "irreconcilable differences" Alex made this zine to explain to everyone why her public relationship came to an end but also to share her experiences, in the hopes that others who might be in a similar situation could relate to it and see they are not alone. Throughout the zine, Alex strives to be diplomatic, never bad-mouthing (although she does recount specific incidents of her ex's behavior) as she describes the controlling, emotionally abusive relationship. The zine is about her: how she lost her sense of self, how the relationship, and his actions, changed her, and how she regained her strength. "What do you do when your private image of your partner doesn't fit with their public image, or even clashes with it?" "There comes a point when your mental well-being is more important than making someone else happy." Brainscan #21 is one of the most candid and empowering zines I have ever read. We can all learn from this zine, about the power dynamics in our relationships, about respect, manipulation, and control. Feminist Review: In her riveting zine, Alex Wrekk writes in raw and powerful detail about her marriage to a man named J who dominates the relationship and systematically chips away at her self-esteem until she feels like a big zero, like she's the one who is crazy. (Projection and gaslighting are tactics of choice used by the cowardly abusers, but victims don’t usually "get it" until they are in way over their head.) I believe no one can fully understand what a Herculean task escaping and recovering from abuse is unless they have traversed a twisted relationship personally. And emotional abuse is particularly insidious because of its lack of visibility. There are no black eyes and no scars to tell the tale. The scars are psychic and horrifically alienating—unless the victim talks to a good therapist and reads about this type of abuse pattern. When I received this zine to review, I figured I’d read a few pages before going to sleep, but I couldn’t stop until I finished the whole story. This woman went above and beyond the call of duty and obligation to her marriage vows in trying to work things out, but, as with these cases, emotional abusers don’t really change. She finally gives up and sets out to save herself, and I wanted to shout “Yay!” It’s a great story, very well paced, and Alex gets extra special reader points from me because of her guts in putting it out there. I also believe that as a writer, Alex benefits from her experience. In the process of excavating herself from the ruins, she wins the prize of a deeper, wiser soul...
$3.00
Released at the 2012 Chicago Zine Fest A split zine with Brainscan #29 and no More Coffee #4 Brainscan #29 - Ben Spies (no more coffee zine) threw out the challenge of fiction to my land of perzines and this is the grim result. These three short stories are my stab at fiction wrapped in the usual high contrast cut and paste layout you would expect in and issue of Brainscan. One story is about leaving a hometown for greener pastures only to make a stop half way there to visit an old friend and includes thoughts and reflections about the past. The second story is about a weird housemate and his strange perception of the world through Woody Allen tinted glasses and odd notions about art. The third story is about weighing the value of our short lives against the rock wall embankment of a cemetery. I admit that the voice is similar to mine and the subject matter doesn't stray too far from what you would expect to find in an issue of Brainscan, but it was a really fun experiment and I'm glad that Ben talked me into doing this split. No More Coffee is a zine of fiction for people who stay up too late. Stories like these are how I get the black bile out of my system, so to speak. Alex and I agreed to do a fiction split not knowing how morose it would end up, but we're on similar wavelengths, I guess. I'm still writing fiction because I love it and because I'm too scared to write about my own life, but even if these stories never happened, the people in them did. "Photographs of the Dead" is about what the residents of a suburban apartment complex doesn't know about their neighbors. "Exit 121" is about an impetuous woman living at a truck stop. The untitled story is about Sunday breakfast at a diner. 44 pages, half sized, 2 color risograph printed card stock covers..
$3.00
Squeaking in at the end of 2012 makes this 30 issues in 15 years! 40 pages, 1/4 sized, 5 color risograph printed on recycled paper! This zine started to be about how awesome 2012 was going to be until the end of my year was almost ruined. I started the zine with the realization that I had grown 2 inch in my 30s somehow and how growing older is great because you get to grow more into yourself, even if you didn't know what you wanted to be when you grew up. I wrote a bit about growing up non-Mormon in Utah. I also write about how I am uncomfortable teaching and how maybe some people just aren't meant to teach just like not everyone is meant to be self employed. Due to a lot of circumstances and privileges in my life I am able to have a lot of adventures. Some of them are travel related and others are ridiculous projects I have been able to be a part of. In retrospect I outline some of my adventures fro each year starting in 2008. Some of the projects have included: traveling to France and the UK, traveling the east coast alone, going on a US zine tour with friends from the UK, attending lots of zine fests, starting a zine themed band called The Copy Scams, touring with the Copy Scams, starting a website for Stolen Sharpie Revolution, and starting a brick and mortar zine distro and button shop called Portland Button Works. The end of the zine wraps up with the how my business partner left Portland and left me a giant mess to clean up when I got back from a long planned trip to the UK. But, I prevailed and overcame and now the distro and shop are stronger and better for it...
$3.00
Brainscan #33 DIY Witchery (an exploration of Secular Witchcraft) In 20 years of publishing Brainscan zine there is one incredibly important thing in my life that I have not written about, and that is witchcraft. I am a witch and I have been studying and practicing witchcraft for over a decade and it has been a very useful tool in my life and personal growth. This zine is a not a how-to-witch zine. This zine is an issue of Brainscan that just happens to be about witchcraft told through my personal narrative. In this zine I explore what witchcraft is, how I became interested in it, how I built my own practice as an agnostic secular witch and how that differs from a lot of contemporary witchcraft. I share a glimpse of what my personal practice as a non-pagan and non-Wiccan witch looks like. I also examine my personal issues with modern pagan and witchcraft culture addressing things like racism, cultural appropriation, colonialism, capitalism, the excessive gendering of all things. My politics are intersectional - so is my witchcraft. I also discuss some tips and a few resource for those that might be interested in exploring witchcraft for themselves. 1/4 legal sized (7"x 4.25") 64 pages with cardstock cover, illustrations by Steve Larder ( Stevelarder.co.uk ) The cover is a Steve Larder Illustration of an altar I made to help with the process of the latest issue of Stolen Sharpie Revolution: A DIY Resource for Zines and Zine Culture by Alex Wrekk   Brainscan #34 a Dabbler's Week of DIY Witchery In January 2020 there was an article/review of a witchcraft book where the author attempted to become a witch in a week by following the ideas in the book. They came to the conclusion that modern witches were anti-vax climate and change deniers. The internet witches freaked out! One clever witch asked what someone should actually do to dabble in witchcraft for a week. Some witches set out to answer that question and this is a zine version of my answer. To me, a big part of studying witchcraft is changing your perspective and seeing the world a little differently. I propose daily activities that starts with cleaning your room, simple energy exercises, what correspondences are how they might work, what animism is, a couple simple spells, and more all told in a conversational non-authoritative tone. 48 pages 1/4 sized with a color card stock cover..
$6.50
In January 2020 there was an article/review of a witchcraft book where the author attempted to become a witch in a week by following the ideas in the book. They came to the conclusion that modern witches were anti-vax climate and change deniers.   The internet witches freaked out! One clever witch asked what someone should actually do to dabble in witchcraft for a week. Some witches set out to answer that question and this is a zine version of my answer.     To me, a big part of studying witchcraft is changing your perspective and seeing the world a little differently. I propose daily activities that starts with cleaning your room, simple energy exercises, what correspondences are how they might work, what animism is, a couple simple spells, and more all told in a conversational non-authoritative tone.   48 pages 1/4 sized with a color card stock cover..
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